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August 2016 Selection

August 4, 2016

Next up is . . .

The Scarlet Pimpernel, by Baroness Emmuska Orczy

A timeless novel of adventure, intrigue, and romance is sparked by one man’s defiance in the face of authority…

The year is 1792. The French Revolution, driven to excess by its own triumph, has turned into a reign of terror. Daily, tumbrels bearing new victims to the guillotine roll over the cobbled streets of Paris.… Thus the stage is set for one of the most enthralling novels of historical adventure ever written.

The mysterious figure known as the Scarlet Pimpernel, sworn to rescue helpless men, women, and children from their doom; his implacable foe, the French agent Chauvelin, relentlessly hunting him down; and lovely Marguerite Blakeney, a beautiful French exile married to an English lord and caught in a terrible conflict of loyalties—all play their parts in a suspenseful tale that ranges from the squalid slums of Paris to the aristocratic salons of London, from intrigue on a great English country estate to the final denouement on the cliffs of the French coast.

The meeting will take place on Thursday, August 25, 2016.

June 2016 Meeting Reminder

June 28, 2016

Our June meeting is coming up this week on Thursday, June 30, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at Sarah Peterson’s house. We’ll be discussing What Alice Forgot, by Liane Moriarty.

Please feel free to come discuss books in general even if you haven’t read this specific book.

See you there!

June 2016 Selection

May 19, 2016

Next up is . . .

What Alice Forgot, by Liane Moriarty

Alice Love is twenty-nine, crazy about her husband, and pregnant with her first child.

So imagine Alice’s surprise when she comes to on the floor of a gym (a gym! She HATES the gym) and is whisked off to the hospital where she discovers the honeymoon is truly over — she’s getting divorced, she has three kids, and she’s actually 39 years old. Alice must reconstruct the events of a lost decade, and find out whether it’s possible to reconstruct her life at the same time. She has to figure out why her sister hardly talks to her, and how is it that she’s become one of those super skinny moms with really expensive clothes. Ultimately, Alice must discover whether forgetting is a blessing or a curse, and whether it’s possible to start over…

The next meeting will take place on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

In the meantime, check back for meeting reminders, links to information on the book, and more. Happy reading!

April 2016 Meeting Report

April 28, 2016

Jamie Frischknecht, Amy Tams, Tyna-Minet Anderson, and Jessica Anderson attended our April meeting. Jessica hosted.

We chatted about Salt to the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys, other books we’ve been reading, and life in general.

April 2016 Meeting Reminder

April 25, 2016

Our April meeting is coming up this week on Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at Jessica Anderson’s house. We’ll be discussing Salt to the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys.

Please feel free to come discuss books in general even if you haven’t read this specific book.

See you there!

April 2016 Selection

April 1, 2016

Next up is . . .

Salt to the Sea, by Ruta Sepetys

World War II is drawing to a close in East Prussia and thousands of refugees are on a desperate trek toward freedom, many with something to hide. Among them are Joana, Emilia, and Florian, whose paths converge en route to the ship that promises salvation, the Wilhelm Gustloff. Forced by circumstance to unite, the three find their strength, courage, and trust in each other tested with each step closer to safety.

Just when it seems freedom is within their grasp, tragedy strikes. Not country, nor culture, nor status matter as all ten thousand people—adults and children alike—aboard must fight for the same thing: survival.

Told in alternating points of view and perfect for fans of Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize-winning All the Light We Cannot See, Erik Larson’s Dead Wake, and Elizabeth Wein’s Printz Honor Book Code Name Verity, this masterful work of historical fiction is inspired by the real-life tragedy that was the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff—the greatest maritime disaster in history. As she did in Between Shades of Gray, Ruta Sepetys unearths a shockingly little-known casualty of a gruesome war, and proves that humanity and love can prevail, even in the darkest of hours.

The next meeting will take place on Thursday, April 28, 2016.

In the meantime, check back for meeting reminders, links to information on the book, and more. Happy reading!

March 2016 Selection

March 1, 2016

Next up is . . .

The Boys in the Boat, by Daniel James Brown

For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Depression comes an irresistible story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant.

It was an unlikely quest from the start. With a team composed of the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington’s eight-oar crew team was never expected to defeat the elite teams of the East Coast and Great Britain, yet they did, going on to shock the world by defeating the German team rowing for Adolf Hitler. The emotional heart of the tale lies with Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, who rows not only to regain his shattered self-regard but also to find a real place for himself in the world. Drawing on the boys’ own journals and vivid memories of a once-in-a-lifetime shared dream, Brown has created an unforgettable portrait of an era, a celebration of a remarkable achievement, and a chronicle of one extraordinary young man’s personal quest.

The next meeting will take place on Thursday, March 31, 2016.

In the meantime, check back for meeting reminders, links to information on the book, and more. Happy reading!